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Female Pilots

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Aviation is mistakenly seen as an industry strictly fit for males. This thinking may also be the reason why only about 4,000 pilots are females among the 130,000 pilots in the world. This means that only a mere 3% of pilots are women.   As our society continues to strive for progress, women should take it upon themselves to break through the stereotypes, and that includes gender bias in all careers.   Women in aviation Throughout the history of aviation, women have had major involvement in all aspects including aircraft design to piloting. It should be noted that prior to the 1970s, women are generally discouraged to enter the industry.   Powered by passion, excitement, and hunger for knowledge, women have been actively doing their part in the improvement of the industry. Here are some of the most notable women of aviation.     Therese Peltier – She is recognized as being possibly the first woman to fly a solo flight. She achieved this feat back in 1908. Bessie Coleman – This lady is acclaimed after being the first pilot of African-American descent. She traveled to France to study in aviation in 1920. After several months, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale issued her license. Amelia Earhart – Despite her unfortunate fate, Amelia is still famous for her contributions to the aviation industry. She is the first woman to complete a transatlantic in 1928. Emily Howell Warner – Emily is known for being the first woman to drive a commercial jetliner after being hired by Frontier Airlines on January 29, 1973. Victoria Louise “Vicki” Van Meter – Known...

How Often Should an Aircraft Be Weighed?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com The weight of an aircraft must be constantly measured for both safety and efficiency reasons. Manufacturers will often provide weight and balance information to the airline who buys the aircraft, but sometimes these are only approximate measurements that were based on existing units and are not gathered from the actual aircraft itself. Frequency of weighing Weight and balance engineers are responsible for checking the weight of the plane. This is done every three or four years to ensure that all data are updated. All kinds of commercial jetliners are to be emptied of all its contents including its fuel, water supply, seats, curtains, etc. The engineers will separately weigh these items. Next, they will measure the empty weight of the aircraft using either large weighing scales or by putting it on top of load cells.   Why planes gain weight Much like people, aircraft tend to get heavier over time. Repainting, patch repairs, aircraft modifications, upholstery, the accumulation of water, dust, and grime, and other factors can affect the plane’s total weight. These may seem like minor components, but they can eventually add up to the point where they can affect the aircraft’s performance. To keep it safe and to make sure that it doesn’t consume too much fuel, constant measurement is necessary. There are stringent international laws stating the required weighing frequency for all kinds of aircraft.   Conclusion Strict aircraft weight regulations exist to ensure the wellbeing of everyone onboard. Keeping track of a plane’s measurements every three to four years make flying a lot safer and can prevent undesirable issues that could happen...

How is an Aircraft Weighed?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Knowing the exact weight of an aircraft is crucial for safety and efficiency. Aircraft performance is significantly affected by its weight and its center of gravity. This is the major reason why airlines impose strict luggage weight limits on its passengers.   Weighing a plane There are two ways you can weigh an aircraft. First is by hoisting the plane slightly above the ground and putting load cells beneath it, and second is through the use of big weighing scales. The latter is more commonly used. The aircraft is positioned in such a way that each wheel is directly on the scales. It’s also necessary for the plane to be perfectly horizontal, which is why Weight and Balance Engineers use a plumb line—a long thread with a heavy piece of lead attached to one end.   Before measuring an aircraft’s empty weight, necessary preparations must be conducted. All compartments must be emptied of luggage and unnecessary items. After that, the fuel and water supplies are completely drained. Snow and rainwater must also be carefully removed to avoid affecting the final measurement.   Engineers need to make sure that everything on their checklist is ticked off before the plane goes on the scale. Once everything is ready, the plane will carefully be positioned on the weighing scales. The engineers will repeat this process about three times before jotting down the final weight of the plane.   With passengers Of course, putting the plane on the scales with passengers onboard isn’t very practical. Hence, statistical methodology is used to get an estimate of the aircraft’s weight including its...

How Do Pilots Start a Plane?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Igniting a plane’s engine for flight is a significantly intricate process in comparison to starting up a car. There is a wide array of aircraft and there is no single way to power any of them. For the sake of this post, we’ll be talking about commercial jets which are used to haul passengers and freight.   Starting an airplane The plane’s engines will only be turned on once the aircraft has been inspected and approved to be fit for flight. This usually takes about 10 minutes, depending on its size and condition. Once that’s done, the pilots can then initiate the ignition process.   As stated above, the operation varies, but the general concept is this:   The engine must have enough compressed air before it can start. This is provided by the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) – a small onboard engine located in the craft’s tail. This is done by turning specific knobs or flipping switches. Some planes may require the use of a Ground Power Unit (GPU) in place of the APU, but there are plane models that use both.   Once the generator is spinning at the proper speed and enough compressed air is provided to the engine, the fuel must then be combusted. The pilot or the secondary pilot will have to operate a lever to introduce fuel to the engine where it will begin to combust along with the hot compressed air. The hot air passes through several turbines, giving the aircraft some increased thrust. The pilot will then monitor the indicators.   This process will have to be repeated...

Do Aircraft Have Key For Ignition?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com When we think of motorized vehicles powering up, we visualize a key being inserted and turned. But what about aircraft? This is a question commonly asked by adults and children alike. The answer is a little bit more complicated, however.   Some small aircraft have keys Lighter aircraft, like the Cessna, are known to have keys for the door and the ignition. These aircraft are usually privately owned and are often parked in areas without 27/7 surveillance. Therefore, keys are used as an extra security measure to prevent thieves from entering and taking off. Small propeller planes may also have throttle locks over the lever or vernier controls which can only be opened by a key or a numerical code, also providing the plane with an added security.   Bigger aircraft do not have keys Conversely, most commercial jets do not require a key for the ignition. The aircraft is powered up by a number of switches, knobs, and levers, which require specific timing and the right sequence before the engine gets powered up. Once the ignition process has been completed, the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) or the Ground Power Unit (GPU) provides the engine with electrical power, afterward, the engine then starts consuming fuel. Another reason why large aircraft do not have keys for ignition is the fact that they are often parked in airports that are under heavy and constant surveillance with armed security personnel roaming the grounds, making keys unnecessary for security. Also, the cockpit can only be accessed if the plane is aligned with a jet bridge/aerobridge, so a person with the...

Does an Aircraft Have a Key?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Airplanes are complicated machines, but how does it start? Do planes have keys? The ignition of an airplane is a mystery that many people think about. In this post, we shed light on this common question to further help you understand how it works. For Smaller Aircraft It’s important to know that there are numerous types of aircraft and not everything works the same. As for the key, smaller airplanes—usually those powered by a single engine like the ones manufactured by Cessna—may have keys for both the ignition and the doors, but not all. Privately-owned aircraft may also have keys for added security from those who may try to steal them. These planes are often left in private locations that may not be under stringent surveillance. For Larger Aircraft Commercial airplanes require a more complex process before they can take flight. Surprisingly, these heavier planes have no keys for the ignition, exterior doors, and sometimes, even luggage compartments. For someone to be able to enter the cockpit, the plane and the jet bridge needs to be properly aligned. The doors themselves do not have keys because the process of connecting the bridge to the plane can be considered as a security measure in itself. As for the ignition, the pilot must operate a set of switches, buttons, and knobs in the right sequence before taking off. Cars only need a key to be inserted and turned for them to power up, but airplanes must undergo certain intricate steps before the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) or Ground Power Unit (GPU) provides electrical power to the engine. Conclusion...

First Female Pilots with License

Photo Credit: pixabay.com As far as aviation history is concerned, females have been taking on essential roles that were surprisingly “unconventional,” based on society’s expectation. You may not know it, but licensed female pilots have been around as far back as 1910. In this article, we present to you a list of the first licensed women who took flight aboard a powered aircraft. Elise Raymonde Deroche a.k.a Raymonde de Laroch This French lady is known for being the world’s first woman who received her license to fly an airplane. Her fondness for motorized vehicles paved her way to make history. She operated a plane on October 22, 1909, with the help of her friend Charles Voisin, who also owned the plane. Her International Aeronautics Federation (FAI) license was issued to her by the Aero-Club of France on March 8, 1910. Bessie Coleman Bessie Coleman is recognized as the first female pilot of African-American descent, as well as the first licensed pilot with Native American blood. Due to the severe discrimination against African-Americans and women in the U.S. at the time, she decided to save money to study aviation in France on November 20, 1920. In 1921, she earned her aviation pilot’s license. Hazel Ying Lee Lee was famous for being the first Chinese-American women who received their aviation license in the US. In 1933, she went back to China in hopes of joining the Chinese Air Force but was unfortunately denied due to her gender. In 1937, she returned to the U.S. where she joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS.) Maria Ziadie-Haddad Maria was born in Jamaica where...

Why Are There So Few Female Airline Pilots?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com When was the last time you flew with a female pilot? If you’re like many, it may have been a while. Some may have yet to experience boarding a plane driven by a female pilot. Since the invention of the airplane, women throughout history played major parts in the flight industry. From aircraft design and creation to airline service positions, women’s involvement in such a field is quite significant, yet there seems to be a barrier preventing them from piloting an aircraft themselves. Today, we list down some of the common reasons behind this issue. Social Stigma The stigma surrounding female pilots are still very much present to this day. Many people view the flight industry as a highly male-dominated career and that female may not really fit in such culture. This is an obsolete mindset and must be changed. Lack of Encouragement Whenever female pilots go around to meet passengers, a lot of people still get surprised. Little girls may have even thought that being a pilot was not an option for them. Encouraging girls and women to try such a skillful and rewarding field must be done by parents, schools, and society as a whole. Fear There are women who turn down the opportunity to enter the pilot career due to fear stemming from numerous beliefs and expectations. They worry about unequal pay, overwhelming stress, gender bias, or even harassment. Nowadays, commercial airlines have implemented strict rules against the discrimination of women. Conclusion As the world continues to progress, women must take it into their hands to break stereotypes, especially in the flight industry....

Female Pilots

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Aviation is mistakenly seen as an industry strictly fit for males. This thinking may also be the reason why only about 4,000 pilots are females among the 130,000 pilots in the world. This means that only a mere 3% of pilots are women. As our society continues to strive for progress, women should take it upon themselves to break through the stereotypes, and that includes gender bias in all careers. Women in Aviation Throughout the history of aviation, women have had major involvement in all aspects including aircraft design to piloting. It should be noted that prior to the 1970s, women are generally discouraged to enter the industry. Powered by passion, excitement, and hunger for knowledge, women have been actively doing their part in the improvement of the industry. Here are some of the most notable women in aviation. Therese Peltier – She is recognized as being possibly the first woman to fly a solo flight. She achieved this feat back in 1908. Bessie Coleman – This lady is acclaimed after being the first pilot of African-American descent. She traveled to France to study aviation in 1920. After several months, the FédérationAéronautiqueInternationale issued her license. Amelia Earhart – Despite her unfortunate fate, Amelia is still famous for her contributions to the aviation industry. She is the first woman to complete a transatlantic in 1928. Emily Howell Warner – Emily is known for being the first woman to drive a commercial jetliner after being hired by Frontier Airlines on January 29, 1973. Victoria Louise “Vicki” Van Meter – Known for being the youngest female to ever pilot...

Tips for First Time Pilots

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Is it your first time piloting a plane? Then here are some tips for first-time pilots like you. Tip 1: Learn as much as you can on the ground before you fly. Learn as much as you possibly can on the ground. A lot of student pilots are focused on the fun of flying and don’t take the time to do their homework. Read flight training books and articles, watch flight training videos and try to learn as much as you possibly can on the ground, then apply what you learned in the air. You might also ask, what is the best plane for a first-time pilot? Well, the best plane is a well-maintained one where the pilot is very much prepared to fly.   Tip 2: Get a weather briefing before each flight. Weather plays a great role in aviation. You need to obtain a weather briefing before each flight and if the conditions are deemed unsafe, it’s best to stay on the ground. The briefer will also let you know about any NOTAMs (notices to airmen) which might affect your flight. This includes things such as runway closures and temporary flight restrictions due to firefighting or a presidential visit. For example, you might find a fighter jet off your wing because you accidentally violated a temporary flight restriction.   Tip 3: Calculate Your Weight & Balance. You need to know how to do a weight & balance calculation since a lot of accidents are caused by pilots flying outside of the weight and balance limits for their airplane. You can expect to be tested...

Airline Travel Health Tips

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Planning a long flight? Let this article help you prepare by giving you some air travel health safety tips before the flight, during the flight and, after the flight and may you never feel unhealthy when traveling by air ever again. Before the flight The airline travel health tips already start even before settling on the plane. First, make sure that the things you need on board are within reach, which includes your medicines (if any), snacks and drinks. Pack enough of your medicines to last your whole trip in your carry-on bag as this prepares you just in case your flight gets delayed, or worse, your checked baggage gets lost. Other healthy carry-on items include disinfectant wipes, hand sanitizer, facial tissues, gum, earplugs or earphones, blanket, pillow, and eye mask. Also, try to get plenty of rest beforehand as well as eat a healthy meal and stay hydrated. Lastly, don’t forget to use the restroom before take-off since it may take a while before you may be allowed to stand and go to the toilet when the plane has taken off. On your flight Now that you are on your flight, the long air travel health tips start. First, you may want to chew gum or wear earplugs or swallow often to help ease pressure on your ears, especially during take-off and landing. Also, bring your water with you to keep yourself hydrated; avoid dehydrating drinks such as those with caffeine or alcohol. If you are at risk of getting blood clots, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) because of prolonged sitting, try to stay active. You may engage your muscles while...

Some Cool Facts About Planes

Photo Credit: pixabay.com You already know that planes fly and they take us to places, but do you know that there are some interesting facts about airplanes don’t know about? Read on for the top cool facts about planes from various sources (i.e., Reader’s Digest, DailyMail Online, Travel and Leisure and Fact Retriever). The long, thin body of an aircraft is called the fuselage, and at the end of the fuselage is where the pilot’s man the plane, which is called the cockpit. Aircraft wings feature a shape called an airfoil which is designed to create lift as the plane moves through the air. As the airplane flies, the air pressure below and above the wings is different, which keeps the airplane airborne. This difference of pressure is termed as “lift.” The little hole in the airplane window is necessary to regulate cabin pressure. Airplane windows are made up of multiple panels, so the hole helps the middle panel from becoming stressed with pressure during flight. When a plane lands at night, cabin crews will dim the interior lights, since in the event that the landing goes badly and evacuating passengers will have their eyes already be adjusted to the darkness. White lines in the sky that follow the plane’s trail are called vapor trails or contrails, which is the result of fuel being burned; it produces carbon dioxide and water, which condenses into tiny droplets behind a plane in the air. The internet and online check-in were first used by Alaska Airlines in 1999. Airplanes are lightning-proof. There are about 200,000 flights airborne every day, across the world. The...

Some Things about the Aircraft Maintenance Training Program

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Pilots and other flight crews are the workers you might immediately think about when you think about aircraft, but those people who work behind-the-scenes also play a very important role in keeping the plane safe and efficient. These lesser known workers are called aircraft maintenance technicians. So what do aircraft maintenance technicians do? Is there such a thing as aircraft maintenance training course or an aircraft maintenance school? What is some the stuff in an aircraft maintenance training program? These may be some questions that you may have right now and we will attempt to answer these for you. What do aircraft maintenance technicians do? An Aircraft Maintenance Technician’s duties typically include replacing and repairing of aircraft parts; assembling and installing electrical, plumbing, mechanical, hydraulic, and structural components and accessories; diagnosing and repairing certain mechanical and electrical problems; testing and supporting performance standards and keeping records of all maintenance and repair work. They typically work outside, in hangars, in repair stations, on airfields. Aircraft Maintenance Training Course This course is for you if you are more interested in the inner workings of the plane rather than the trip itself. This course focuses on mechanical, electrical, electronic and other science skills related to aircraft maintenance. It also emphasizes the repair of electrical and mechanical systems within aircraft. In the duration of your study, you will concentrate on a variety of topics related to hydraulics, fuels, environmental systems, engines, flight controls, landing gear systems, airframes, and structure. Becoming an Aircraft Maintenance Technician On becoming a technician, you could choose to go to college or a technical school to...

Airline Pilot Duties

Photo Credit: pixabay.com Generally, an airline pilot’s duties and responsibilities are always geared towards safe and economic operation and management of an aircraft, whether carrying passengers or freight. They also ensure that the controls of the aircraft are working properly, weather conditions are optimal for flight and establish communications with air traffic control. Their job is very unpredictable which demands unconventional hours in a very complex workplace. For pre-flight preparation, the airline pilot’s duties include filing the flight plan and calculating fuel required, with consideration of certain weather information and passenger/cargo weights. They also conduct checks on aircraft controls, instruments, and engines. They coordinate with operations control staff, engineers and cabin crew in checking that the aircraft and its systems are prepared for departure. During the flight, the pilot with his co-pilot operates and navigates the aircraft, communicates with air traffic control, listens to weather reports, monitors engines, and systems, checks fuel consumption, and advises passengers on the progress of their flight. After landing, when the aircraft has been taxied to its final position, the pilot shuts down the engines and writes a flight report, noting any problems or technical difficulties. To summarize, the airline pilot’s job description and activities include: Carrying out pre-flight checks of aircraft systems and making sure the aircraft insurance certificates and other legal paperwork is up to date; Acquiring information about the route, weather, passengers, and aircraft to calculate best fuel quantity required; Liaising with engineers, dispatchers, cabin crew and controllers; and Briefing cabin crew, following air traffic control instructions and keeping passengers informed about progress. Some of his responsibilities also include: Ensuring that...

On Getting a Private Pilot’s License and Commercial Pilot License

Photo Credit: pixabay.com You may be wondering, what is the difference between the Private and Commercial Pilot courses? You may also be wondering, is there is such a thing in the Philippines? You may have already done countless google searches on “getting a private pilot’s license” or “what’s a private pilot license?” or “what is a commercial pilot course” but you still just can’t get what you are searching for? Well, read on as we walk you through the difference between the two. So, what’s the difference? Simply put, if you have your own plane or you have flying as a hobby, then the Private Pilot Course or PPC is the one for you. On the other hand, if you want to make aviation as your career, then the Commercial Pilot Course is the one you should take. To discuss matters further, if you graduated with a PPC, you will be considered as a non-professional pilot. PPC students shall learn the following subjects: (1) Aviation rules and regulations and appropriate air traffic practices and procedures; (2) Principles of operation of airplanes power plants, systems and instruments as well as operating limitations of airplanes; (3) Flight performance and planning; (4) Application of aeronautical meteorology as well as the procedures for obtaining meteorological information; (5) Navigation; and (6) Principles of flight. Afterwhich, you will be legitimate to apply for a Private Pilot License or PPL, which is a qualification that permits you to fly a plane (but not for compensation) or fly a plane on airplanes in non-commercial operations. Private pilot license in the Philippines already exists as of this moment and...

Why the Plane was Invented and Some Historical Tidbits

Photo Credit: pixabay.com You may wonder why the plane was invented? Due to man’s desire to discover new methods of transportation and the desire to travel long distances without the complications of terrain as well as to travel in the shortest time possible, the plane was then created. What was the first flight in history? While many believe that the airplane was invented by the Wright brothers in Kitty Hawk, N.C., it was said that the first man to fly was New Zealander Richard Pearse in 1902, eight months before the Wright brothers first flew. Pearse, according to witnesses, flew a length of 50 to 400 yards in a heavier-than-air machine. Pearse’s aircraft was the first to use proper ailerons, which allowed the wings to warp and turn the aircraft. Though many credit the invention of airplanes to the Wright brothers, Richard Pearse never reported his inventions because he didn’t know there was any interest in flying. However, the Wright brothers were the first flyers to be officially recorded and the first to have also patented their invention. Though the Wright brothers tested many gliders in the early 1900s, none of them counted as an actual aircraft, and the brothers didn’t achieve flight until late 1903 with their first plane, the Flyer I. The craft weighed over 600 pounds, and Orville Wright was the first pilot, which was decided through a toss coin. The craft remained airborne for 12 seconds and traveled a little over 120 feet. To zoom in on the aviation history of the Philippines, here is a timeline of the Philippine Airline Industry: The government created an...

HRS for the Win, Again!

The most anticipated and prestigious culinary competition in Mindanao is back in Davao City to showcase the talents, skills, and creativity of Davaoeños. The 2017 Davao Culinary Cup (DCC), powered by Philippine Culinary Cup (PCC), held its 3rd Culinary Competition last  August 29 to 31, 2017 at the Atrium of SM Lanang Premier. “It’s a competition where we actually want to introduce the standards here in Davao and of course, learn from people in Davao,”  said Chef James Antolin of LTB Manila and Competition Director of the event, when he was asked about the main objective of the event. 228 aspiring chefs from different culinary colleges,   establishments, and institutions all over Mindanao competed in the region.  This year,  6 participants from Hotel and Restaurant Services( HRS) of Asian and International School of Aeronautics and Technology vied in the Savory Category; Young Chef’s Team Category, Pasta Category, and Local Fish or Seafood Category. Despite the heightened pressure due to the changes in the rules on preparation time and quantity of servings, participants valiantly and keenly prepared their dishes. “Our one-week preparation was rigid because we had to teach the basics,” exclaimed Chef Ariel de Leon, HRS Instructor, and mentor “ Even though most of the representatives were first timers, we trust our students that they will do their best,” he added. Indeed, the efforts were all worth it! The AISAT HRS Department celebrated as Joshua San Pedro and Jose Carlos San Pedro batted the Bronze medal in the Young Chef’s Team Category with their dishes Prawn Thermidor and Prosciutto Stuffed Chicken with Mushroom and crusted Cashew Nuts. Participants really made...

What is an Airfoil in Aviation?

Photo Credit: pixabay.com You may or may not have heard what is an airfoil on an airplane. What is an airfoil and how does it work?  An airfoil is the shape of the aircraft’s wing, blade (of a propeller, rotor, or turbine). It is the term used to describe the cross-sectional shape of an object that, when moved through a fluid such as air, creates an aerodynamic force. Airfoils are employed on aircraft as wings to produce lift or as propeller blades to produce thrust. Both these forces are produce perpendicular to the air flow. Drag is a consequence of the production of lift/thrust and acts parallel to the airflow. Other airfoil surfaces include tailplanes, fins, winglets, and helicopter rotor blades. Control surfaces are shaped to contribute to the overall aerofoil section of the wing or empennage The basic principle behind an aerofoil is described by Bernoulli’s theorem. Basically, this states that total pressure is equal to static pressure (due to the weight of air above) plus dynamic pressure (due to the motion of air). Air that travels over the top surface of the aerofoil has to travel faster and thus gains dynamic pressure. The subsequent loss of static pressure creates a pressure difference between the upper and lower surfaces that is called the lift and opposes the weight of an aircraft (or thrust that opposes drag). As the angle of attack (the angle between the chord line and relative air flow) is increased, more lift is created. Once the critical angle of attack is reached (generally around 14 degrees) the aerofoil will stall. According to Dynamic Flight (2002), several terms are used to describe what...